Self-care in the Time of COVID-19

With COVID-19 very much a part of our lives, we have collective feelings of being uncomfortable or out of sorts. This feeling can be attributed to a global grief, and the antidote is being tender with ourselves – and others. Stressed out has become the new normal, and, clearly, it’s not healthy.

Life and Death, Tragedy and Grief in the time of COVID-19

Grief can be an isolating experience, but as the world adapts to life in a pandemic, we are forced to redesign how we grieve as communities in isolation. And when a community is unable to physically come together in tragedy, they find ways to be together, apart.

All the Things

All the Things

No matter how organized a person, there are still things to be handled after someone dies. Items accumulated in a lifetime have to go somewhere, and family members left behind are given the task of cleaning and clearing out the home of someone they’ve lost.

Dumb Supper

The Dumb Supper: Dining with the Dead

In 1692, in Salem, Massachusetts, nineteen people were executed for practicing the “devil’s work,” or, in other words, being witches. Fourteen were women, five were men. In 2019, at the end of October, also in Salem, Massachusetts, modern day witches celebrate the Festival of the Dead.

Dead Like Me

Dying to Watch: Binge-worthy Series

Over the years many TV shows have dealt with death. From a family of funeral directors to a man in deep anger in his grief, these series have actually created a conversation about death and dying, sometimes comedic, sometimes touching and sometimes painfully realistic. When You Die team member, Kelley Edwards, picks and shares her favourite binge-worthy series. (Caution, there may be some spoilers ahead.)

Death of a Loved One: The Year of Firsts

This winter, my very close friend lost her mom. She and her siblings were very close to their mother and so the loss of her mother was significant. I knew the feeling of losing a parent. Going through the death of a parent is a difficult process, but I also knew that it wasn’t over.

Where Once There Was Life

Deborah Luscomb is one of the facilitators of the Halifax Death Café and leads Death Matters workshops in the area. She acts as an end of life concierge, assisting during the transition and post-mortem experience. Deborah has a passion for bringing people together around difficult conversations, like death and dying.

Can Children Handle Death?

We want to protect our children, but if we don’t talk to them about death, are we hurting instead of helping?

Death and Food

From sin eaters to sharing food that is symbolic of the circle of life, eating together after a loss is a communal grief practice throughout time and culture.